Since its inception in 2005, the North Carolina Practice Improvement Collaborative (NC PIC) has been reviewing evidence-based and evidence-informed programs and practices (EBPs) for potential adoption and implementation in the State.  With this issue of the biweekly newsletter, we are embarking on a short series, highlighting EBPs for the disability groups.

The Matrix Model is a 16-week intensive outpatient treatment approach for stimulant abuse and dependence.  Aimed at young adults and adults, outcomes focus on treatment retention, treatment completion, and drug use during treatment.  It was reviewed by SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Practices and Programs (NREPP) in December 2006; the reviewers found that the quality of research ranged from 2.0 to 3.1; overall rating readiness of dissemination of 3.5 (rating scales ranged from a low of 0.0 to a high of 4.0).  The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse (CEBC) reviewed it in June 2012; they gave it a scientific rating of 3, where 1 has the strongest research evidence and 5 has concerns about substantial risk to children and families.

Motivational Interviewing is a goal-directed, client-centered approach in which the client and clinician work together to change behaviors through an agreed upon action plan.  Aimed at all adults, outcomes focus on alcohol and other substance use (cocaine and opiates); negative consequences/problems associated with alcohol use; drinking and driving; alcohol-related injuries; and retention in treatment.  NREPP indicated that the quality of research ranged from 3.3 to 4.0 and that the overall rating readiness of dissemination was 3.9 in the December 2007 review.  In June 2013, CEBC gave it a scientific rating of 1.  A complementary tool developed by the NIDA-SAMHSA Blending Initiative (but not reviewed by NREPP or CEBC), the Motivational Interviewing Assessment: Supervisory Tools for Enhancing Proficiency (MIA: STEP) assists supervisors in their efforts to coach and supervise staff clinicians.

Prize Incentives Contingency Management for Substance Abuse rewards clients for abstinence and treatment compliance.   Data on outcomes include drug use during treatment; drug use after treatment; drug problem severity during and after treatment; quality of life; treatment retention; and group/counseling attendance.  The NREPP review in August 2007 found that the quality of research ranged from 3.0 to 4.0, and gave an overall rating for readiness of dissemination of 2.9.  Developed by the NIDA-SAMHSA Blending Initiative (but not reviewed by NREPP or CEBC), a complementary tool is the Promoting Awareness of Motivational Incentives (PAMI) Tool Package.

Seeking Safety is a therapy used with clients who are struggling with substance abuse and a history of trauma/PTSD.  Aimed at teens and adults, it can be offered on an individual or group basis.  Reviewed by NREPP in October 2006, the quality of research ranged from 2.0 to 3.4, and the overall rating for readiness of dissemination was 4.0. CEBC reviewed it for adults in July 2013 and gave it a scientific rating of 2 and reviewed it for adolescents in June 2013 and gave it a scientific rating of 3.

SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) is a way to identify and intervene with individuals with substance use disorders in a primary care setting.  The NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services currently has a SBIRT grant from SAMHSA in which substance abuse professionals are co-located in primary care practices in the Northwest Community Care and Sandhills Community Care Networks.  In May 2011, NREPP reviewed Project ASSERT (Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services, Education, and Referral to Treatment) for use in clinics and emergency departments.  Reviewers found that the quality of research ranged from 3.0 to 4.0 and gave it an overall rating of readiness of dissemination of 4.0.

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